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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)
woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we examine the military alliance between the u.s. and south korea, amid new worries over the north's nuclear weapons capabilities. >> woodruff: then, we get the latest from venezuela, where voters are preparing to choose a successor to the late president, hugo chavez. >> brown: taxes are due monday, that's certain. what's not clear are prospects for any meaningful tax reform. we debate some options on the table. >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan has the story of aereo-- a new internet t.v. service and the backlash from traditional broadcasters. >> theres millions and millions of dollars this in the:s that the broadcast networks have-- receive in licensing fees from cable companies. they want aereo's pay in the same way. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and we remember jonathan winters-- the comedian who mastered improvisation and brought laughter to generations of fans. >> i think comedy and whether i think it's the rarest thing-- i'm sure others hopefully would agree-- that l
of dzhokar tsarnaev, upgraded today to fair. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown examines the lessons learned for public safety officials about security at big events and gatherings. >> ifill: then, a powerful democrat, montana's max baucus, is the eighth senator to say he won't seek reelection next year. we look at why democrats are worried. >> woodruff: fred de sam lazaro reports on gender bias in india, where many parents still opt for baby boys over girls. >> the gap began to wideen in the '90s with new ultrasound machines that made it easy to learn a fetus's sex. this scans have led to the termination of millions of female pregnancies. >> ifill: and margaret warner talks with the author of a new book about shadow warfare waged by the c.i.a. and special forces. >> a week after 9/11 president bush gave the c.i.a. lethal authority to capture and kill al qaeda members so they become much more into the killing business and the military. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the e
with nuclear weapons and moved a missile to its eastern coastline. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the latest provocation from pyongyang and the reaction in the u.s. and elsewhere. >> brown: then, we examine possible links between a white supremacist prison gang and recent murders of law enforcement officials. >> woodruff: we get the details on new research showing the soaring price tag for treating dementia now topping the cost of cancer and heart disease. >> brown: from the african nation of kenya: kira kay reports on the religious divide in the port city of mombasa. >> the salvation army is a christian congregation, nestled in the heart of a predominantly muslim city. their faith had never been an issue, but that changed in august last year. >> woodruff: and we talk with the supreme court's first female justice, sandra day o'connor about the court's storied history as told in her new book: "out of order." >> i think people know very little, really, about the court: how it works, and its history. and both of those thing
on a comprehensive guns bill. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest from capitol hill as senators kick off an extended period of debate over gun legislation. >> brown: then, medicare and social security face changes in the president's new budget. we debate the potential impact. >> woodruff: education correspondent john merrow reports on a rise in high school graduation rates, but the numbers raise questions and educators search for new ways to inspire kids to succeed. >> for kids to believe school is going to lead them somewhere you have to have really strong pathways to adult success, so some could lead the college, some could lead to really solid job training opportunities that lead to a job. >> brown: we look at a clinical trial designed to study premature babies, but that allegedly failed to disclose risks of death and blindness. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks to the author of a new book that tracks the history of political power as it becomes harder to use and even harder to keep. >> we've seen a lot of democracies are c
. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation into who was behind the attack, which president obama now calls a "terrorist act." >> brown: three people were killed and more than 150 were injured, many critically. hari sreenivasan talks with a trauma doctor who led a team that treated the wounded. >> one of our trauma surgeons ran the marathon and when he finished realized what was happening and came in to operate on some of the patients. >> ifill: and the daily download team looks at social media's role in spreading tragic as well as healing messages. >> brown: then, the supreme court takes up a child custody case that tests the scope of a federal law intended to protect native american families. marcia coyle recaps today's arguments. >> ifill: and a new bipartisan report finds that after 9/11, the u.s. "engaged in the practice of torture" with detainees. we talk with two of the authors. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: mo
with jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by bp. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you.
. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown examines the impact of across- the-board federal spending cuts on scientific research. >> ifill: john merrow reports on a kentucky school district that's spending less time testing students and more time on projects like building rockets. >> are they learning? yes. i feel like they're probably learning more than they ever would just sitting there hearing me tell them about a certain section of textbook. >> woodruff: we get the latest on an arizona man freed from prison after 42 years, when new evidence surfaced about his murder conviction. >> ifill: and we close with the story of a theater group that brings shakespeare's classics into schools, as a way to reduce teasing and teen violence. >> there's characters in the plays that are more the bullying type. there's some that are more the victims. it really lends itself to a conversation about all those roles. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program
sticking point: expanding background checks on gun sales. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey brown talks to a film producer who went "behind the lines" of the syrian conflict, the topic of tonight's "frontline." >> everyday i was witnessing bloodshed. i was either seeing people get killed or i was seeing the aftermath of people being killed or i was seeing people being buried. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of a new way to invest, as goldman sachs partners with the city of new york to keep teenagers from returning to prison. >> we believe that we will make 5% on this. and we're not doing it to be charitable, we're doing it because it's an investment. >> woodruff: and as funeral arrangements are set for former prime minister margaret thatcher, we assess the divisive policies of the "iron lady." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> more than two years ago, the people of b.p. made a commitment to the gulf. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy. we shared what
: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get reaction to today's vote and what it means for the future of gun legislation. >> ifill: then, conflicting reports caused confusion over the status of the investigation into the boston bombings. we have the latest on what's known and what's not. >> brown: letters sent to the president and members of congress were believed to contain the poison, ricin. todd zwillich of wnyc reports on the suspicious packages. >> ifill: and britain's first female prime minister is buried. in london, thousands turn out to wish margaret thatcher a fond farewell, others to bid her good riddance. >> brown: marcia coyle has analysis of today's unanimous ruling from the supreme court that blocks human rights cases abroad from being tried in the u.s. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks to the author of the new book "clean," about his deep dive into the myths and realities of drug addiction. >> it's seen as a choice: "if you're having problems in your life because you're using drugs or you're drinking, stop." well, people who are addicted would stop, if th
confirmed dead. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we detail the violent chase to bring the suspects to justice, as swat teams cordon off wide swaths of the city and surrounding towns to capture 19-year-old dzokhar tsarnaev. >> brown: we explore what's known so far about the brothers suspected in the deadly attack. >> suarez: we examine how investigators are trying to figure out whether the brothers acted alone or were part of a larger terrorist organization. >> brown: and we look at how technology allowed police and
of mass destruction. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the investigation, both in the u.s. and abroad, into the two brothers believed to be behind the blasts, as the youngest remains hospitalized in serious, but stable condition. >> ifill: and we explore the legal questions raised by trying dzhokhar tsarnaev in federal court. >> brown: then, ray suarez gets an update on guantanamo bay, where more than half the prisoners are now on a hunger strike, protesting their indefinite detentions. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of older workers starting new businesses late in life. >> if you're smart and you realize you're getting older, well then, get into a business where you leverage the younger people and eventually you become the great gray god. >> brown: and judy woodruff looks into the trial of kermit gosnell-- the philadelphia abortion doctor accused of eight counts of murder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy fo
inspired to mount the attacks. >> ifill: plus, jeffrey brown talks to kenneth feierg, the man charged with overseeinghe $21 million fund to compensate the wounded and the families of the dead.
square. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the new york plot and discuss what u.s. intelligence knew about tamerlan tsarnaev in the months and years before the attack on boston. >> brown: then, the u.s. believes the syrian government has used chemical weapons. but it needs more conclusive proof before reaching the red line for military intervention. >> woodruff: all of the living men who've ever worked from the oval officehe
evidence is needed. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we debate the options on the table for the u.s. if it's confirmed assad's regime has used sarin in the civil war that's killed more than 70,000 people. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner looks at congress's sudden push to get airlines back onime after spending cuts caused wide-spread delays. >> brown: in bangladesh, the death toll in this week's tragic collapse of a garment factory has passed 300. ray suarez explores the role of american retailers in keeping workers at their overseas suppliers safe. >> woodruff: mark shields and
: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at the latest figures and assess the impact of new technologies, including robotics, on the modern workforce. >> woodruff: then, hari sreenivasan reports on the struggle faced by millions of syrians: uprooted from their homes, but unable to leave their country. >> they suffer from lack of food. in the winter, there was no heating units-- freezing temperatures with little clothing options, blankets-- all of these are in short supply. >> brown: we examine a major ruling on the morning after pill, as a federal judge ordered the fda to make it available, without prescription, to women and girls of all ages. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with the story of an expose of hidden off-shore bank accounts around the globe. >> the first consequence, i guess, is that a secret world is no longer secret, and it's going to send shivers through this world. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also
today to fair. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown examines the lessons learned for public safety officials about security at big events and gatherings. >> ifill: then, a powerful democratmontana's max baucus, is the eighth senator to say he won't seek reelection next year. we look at why democrats are worried. >> woodruff: fred de sam lazaro reports on gender bias in india, where many parents still opt for baby boys over girls. >> the gap began to wideen in the '90s with new ultrasound machines that made it easy to learn a fetus's sex. this scans have led to the termination of millions of female pregnancies. >> ifill: and margaret warner talks with the author of a new book about shadow wfa waged bythe c.i.a. and speal forces. >> a week after 9/11 president bush gave the c.i.a. lethal authority to capture and kill al qaeda members so they become much more into the killing business and the military. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the
the street. they're getting from their homes. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown explores moves by five states to restrict access to abortion services. >> most americans have a common sense approach to abortion where they want parental consent-- consent, informed consent. americans believe they can make these personal decisions. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by b.p./ >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama marked the first 100 days of his second term today, using a news conference to demand action on his agenda, from guantanamo to guns. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> do you still have the juice to get the rest of your agenda through this congress? >> if you put it that way, jonathan, maybe i shou
forced the evacuation of more than 20 homes. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown examines the impact of across- the-board federal spending cuts on scientific research. >> ifill: john merrow reports on a kentucky school district that's spending less time testing students and more time on projects like building rockets. >> are they learning? yes. i feel like they're probably learning more than they ever would just sitting there hearing me tell them about a certain section of textbook. >> woodruff: we get the latest on an arizona man freed from prison after 42 years, when new evidence surfaced about his murder conviction. >> ifill: and we close with the story of a theater group that brings shakespeare's classics into schools, as a way to reduce teasing and teen violence. >> there's characters in the plays that are more the bullying type. there's some that are more the victims. it really lends itself to a conversation about all those roles. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these instit
reflects on his working class upbringing and 70 years of writing verse in a conversation with jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by bp. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with congress poised to take up gun control legislation in the coming days, the national rifle association battled back today as it tried to shift attention to a different proposal. it calls for arming trained personnel in every public u.s. school. the n.r.a. turned a former republican congressman asa hutchinson to chair what it calls the national school shield task force. he laid out the center piece of its 225-
been inspired to mount the attacks. >> ifill: plus, jeffrey brown talks to kenneth feierg, the man charged with overseeinghe $21 million fund to compensate the wounded and the families of the dead. >> woodruff: then, we update the search for the source of poison- laced letters sent to president obama and a u.s. senator. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on the raging mississippi river floods that have inundated multiple states. >> reporter: steady downpours across the midwest have swollen streams, creeks and rivers beyond their banks. four people, in three states, have died in the floodwaters. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets two views on whether food sent overseas to helporeigners in need should be bought from u.s. farmers and shipped on u.s. vessels. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support f the instutions and fouatns. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >
: expanding background checks on gun sales. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey brown talks to a film producer who went "behind the lines" of the syrian conflict, the topic of tonight's "frontline." >> everyday i was witnessing bloodshed. i was either seeing people get killed or i was seeing the aftermath of people being killed or i was seeing people being buried. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of a new way to invest, as goldman sachs partners with the city of new york to keep teenagers from returning to prison. >> we believe that we will make 5% on this. and we're not doing it to be charitable, we're doing it because it's an investment. >> woodruff: and as funeral arrangements are set for former prime minister margaret thatcher, we assess the divisive policies of the "iron lady." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> more than two years ago, the people of b.p. made a commitment to the gulf. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy. we shared what we've learned so t
'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the latest provocation from pyongya and the reactio in the u.s. and elsewhere. >> brown: then, we examine possible links between a white supremacist prison gang and recent murders of law enforcement officials. >> woodruff: we get the details on new research showing the soaring price tag for treating dementia now topping the cost of cancer and heart disease. >> brown: from the african nation of kenya: kira kay reports on the religious divide in the port city of mombasa. >> the salvation army is a christian congregation, nestled in the heart of a predominantly muslim city. their faith had never been an issue, but that changed in august last year. >> woodruff: and we talk with the supreme court's first female justice, sandra day o'connor about the court's storied history as told in her new book: "out of order." >> i think people know very little, really, about the court: how it works, and its history. and both of those things are important in our country. >> brown: and we remember roger ebert. the
'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest from capitol hill as senators kick off an extended period of debate over gun legislation. >> brown: then, medicare and social security face changes in the president's new budget. we debate the potential impact. >> woodruff: education correspondent john merrow reports on a rise in high school graduation rates, but the numbers raise questions and educators search for new ways to inspire kids to succeed. >> for kids to believe school is going to lead them somewhere you have to have really strong pathways to adult success, so some could lead the college, some could lead to really solid job training opportunities that lead to a job. >> brown: we look at a clinical trial designed to stud premature baes, t that allegedly failed to disclose risks of death and blindness. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks to the author of a new book that tracks the history of political power as it becomes harder to use and even harder to keep. >> we've seen a lot of democracies are choking in checks and balances. therefore too
's history. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation into who was behind the attack, which president obama now calls a "terrorist act." >> brown: three people were killed and more than 150 were injured, many critically. hari sreenivasan talks with a trauma doctor who led a team that treated the wounded. >> one of our trauma surgeons ran the marathon and when he finied realized what was happening and came in to operate on some of the patients. >> ifill: and the daily download team looks at social media's role in spreading tragic as well as healing messages. >> brown: then, the supreme court takes up a child custody case that tests the scope of a federal law intended to protect native american families. marcia coyle recaps today's arguments. >> ifill: and a new bipartisan report finds that after 9/11, the u.s. "engaged in the practice of torture" with detainees. we talk with two of the authors. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: movi
control advocates. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get reaction to today's vote and what it means for the future of gun legislation. >> ifill: then, conflicting reports caused confusion over the status of the investigation into the boston bombings. we have the latest on what's known and what's not. >> brown: letters sent to the president and members of congress were believed to contain the poison, ricin. todd zwillich of wnyc reports on the suspicious packages. >> ifill: and britain's first female prime minister is buried. in london, thousands turn out to wish margaret thatcher a fond farewell, others to bid her good riddance. >> brown: marcia coyle has analysis of today's unanimous ruling from the supreme court that blocks human rights cases abroad from being tried in the u.s. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks to the author of the new book "clean," about his deep dive into the myths and realities of drug addiction. >> it's seen as a choice: "if you're having problems in your life because you're using drugs or you're drin
'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest from west, texas where the death toll is uncertain, scores are injured and the frantic search for survivors continues. >> i walked through the blast area, i searched some houses earlier tonight-- massive, just like iraq, just like the murrah building in oklahoma city. >> brown: then, the f.b.i. released photos of two suspects in the boston bombings. we update the investigation, as the president and first lady attend a prayer service in the city to mourn the victims and offer words of hope. >> even when our heart aches, we summon the strength that maybe we didn't even know we had. and we carry on; we finish the race. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan reports on the increased use of drones here at home, amid growing concerns about privacy and their use down the road. >> brown: a new path to citizenship for the country's 11 million un-documented immigrants was unveiled today by a bi- partisan group of senators. margaret warner talks to one of them, dick durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down wit
officer and one of two brothers being sought confirmed dead. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we detail the violent chase to bring the suspects to justice, as swat teams cordon off wide swaths of the city and surrounding towns to capture 19-year-old dzokhar tsarnaev. >> brown: we explore what's known so far about the brothers suspected in the deadly attack. >> suarez: we examine how investigators are trying to figure out whether the brothers acted alone or were part of a larger terrorist organization. >> brown: and we look at how technology allowed police and thpu t >> suarez: plus, we get the perspective of mark shields and david brooks on terror's return to u.s. soil and the rest of the week's news. nighrown: that's all ahead on s "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support
'm jeffrey brown. washington week can be seen later on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and follow a timeline of event. we'll be here again monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you for joining us, good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >>> this is "nightly business report" with tyler mathisen and susie gharib, brought to you by -- >> thestreet.com. interactive financial multimedia tools for an ever changing financial world. our dividend stock adviser guides and helps generate income during a peri
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the investigation, both in the u.s. and abroad, into the two brothers believed to be behind the blasts, as the youngest remains hospitalized in serious, but stable condition. >> ifill: and we explore the legal questions raised by trying dzhokhar tsarnaev in federal court. >> brown: then, ray suarez gets an update on guantanamo bay, where more than half the prisoners are now on a hunger strike, protesting their indefinite detentions. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of older workers starting new businesses late in life. >> if you're smart and you realize you're getting older, well then, get into a business where you leverage the younger people and eventually you become the great gray god. >> brown: and judy woodruff looks into the trial of kermit gosnell-- the philadelphia abortion doctor accused of eight counts of murder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> an
evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the new york plot and discuss what u.s. intelligence knew about tamerlan tsarnaev in the months and years before the attack on boston. >> brown: then, the u.s. believes the syrian government has used chemical weapons. but it needs more conclusive proof before reaching the red line for military intervention. >> woodruff: all of the living men who've ever worked from the oval office gathered in dallas today for the dedication of the george w. bush presidential library. we explore how these libraries shape our understanding of history. >> brown: and we close with a behind-the-scenes look at the lobbying fight over gun control. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoi
evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we debate the options on the table for the u.s. if it's confirmed assad's regime has used sarin in the civil war that's killed more than 70,000 people. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner looks at congress's sudden push to get airlines back on-time after spending cuts caused wide-spread delays. >> brown: in bangladesh, the death toll in this week's tragic collapse of a garment factory has passed 300. ray suarez explores the role of american retailers in keeping workers at their overseas suppliers safe. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and the world of country music lost one of its titans. we remember george jones who died today in nashville. >> ♪ he stopped loving her today >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)